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Data Driven Government and Parks and Recreation

Boston, Massachusetts
May 12-13, 2016

From constantly changing technological requirements to citizens’ increasing dependence on technology, cities, and park and recreation agencies in particular, are faced with many challenges which require innovative solutions.

NRPA in conjunction with the City of Boston, the Boston Department of Parks and Recreation, and Sasaki Associates hosted an NRPA Innovation Lab in Boston, MA to determine how innovation in data driven government will affect the field of parks and recreation, and how public agencies can leverage that data.

Thought leaders from both inside and outside the field were invited to attend this special interactive event designed to use cities and park and recreation departments as the host and subject matter to help us understand how parks and recreation can continue to play a key role in solving problems faced by cities today.

 

What Was Learned:

  • How a wide variety of stakeholders from the public, private and academic realms are using data to further multiple policy objectives and how it can be applied at an agency.
  • How to apply lessons learned from Boston Parks and Recreation’s success in collecting and utilizing data and technology at an agency.
  • How parks and recreation data can raise your agency's profile through a better understanding of the social and economic value of an agency to a community.
  • View the event agenda.
  • Webinar: Big Data and Technology in Park and Recreation (June 9, 2016)

 

Photo Gallery

View photos from the Boston event below!

 

Click here to see a list of future and past Innovation Labs.

 

 Boston Sponsors

 

 

For questions or more information contact Michele White, NRPA’s Director of Strategic Initiatives and Governance mwhite@nrpa.org

 

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