Editors Letter

Unplug and Play

Given today’s tech-obsessed world, we often find ourselves glued to our small screens, while forgetting that there’s a whole world outside waiting to be discovered.

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Healthy Choices for Life

You can’t preach what you fail to practice.

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Leadership Through Encouragement

Many leaders make sacrifices and work hard to reach their goals, but they also acknowledge that they cannot be truly effective if they fail to teach, nurture and motivate their staffers to achieve their own success.

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Creating Tomorrow’s Conservationists

By helping children develop an early passion and appreciation for nature, you could be creating the next generation of conservationists.

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Parks and Rec Up Close

As the new year unfolds, it’s not uncommon for park and recreation professionals to ask themselves: “What will the next 12 months bring?”

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Showing Our Resolve

Time and time again, park and recreation agencies have shown their resolve by facing challenges head on, leading their communities through tough times and finding the silver lining in the wake of tragedy and adversity.

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Inclusion Is The Solution

Social equity serves a critical purpose: helping park and recreation agencies create a positive influence on the communities that they serve by emphasizing inclusion of all community members.

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Hate Has No Place Here

Parks should be places that unite communities, not divide them. It’s our job to create places that respect the opinions of all community members and welcome people from all walks of life.

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Arts and Parks: A Natural Fit

Arts and culture reflect our natural surroundings — whether it’s Ansel Adams’s photograph, “Yosemite Falls,” or the PBS documentary, “10 Parks that Changed America” — arts give us a greater appreciation of our green spaces, as well as bring awareness to environmental causes.

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A Guiding Hand

Find out what all awaits you in the pages of this month's Parks & Recreation magazine.

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Keep On Moving

What's the key to staying mentally and physically "young" as we age?

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Celebrating Community and People

Two communities: one celebrating renewal; the other diversity - both celebrating togetherness.

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Another Year of Progress

More and more, cities are being defined by the open space and public parks that connect city dwellers to nature and offer access to healthier lifestyles.

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The Good, the Bad and the Resilient

When the going gets tough, parks and recreation gets going.

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History in the Making

In this issue of Parks & Recreation magazine, we bring to light the history of the National Park Service, which is celebrating its centennial, and the ADA, which marked its 25th anniversary last year.

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Park Panacea

Connecting parks with public health as part of a comprehensive approach to achieving healthy outcomes for patients.

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This Much We Know

I have always been reluctant to get too wrapped up in generalizing about age groups. Too often we run the risk of being flat-out wrong, insulting, or both. But, when a demographic tidal wave of 72 million enters its retirement years, it’s just too large to ignore. This is especially true for the field of parks and recreation.

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Natural Leaders and Changing Models

Reaching out to fellow agencies and private partners is the new model of park leadership, whether in creating greener communities or managing park operations. This month's feature stories on conservation leaders and public-private partnerships show the power of outreach and partnership--though in vastly different ways.

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Solid Green

Now is the time for park and recreation agencies to leverage all the environmental good they do by embracing roles as conservation leaders in their communities.

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Issues and Trends

The February 2012 issue of Parks & Recreation explores topics related to the economy: funding the Land and Water Conservation Fund, Occupy Wall Street, invasive species, technology, developing non-traditional open spaces, and Washington State parks.

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