Community gardens throughout the United States provide children and adults the space and opportunity to grow their own foods. These gardens cultivate lifelong lessons about the origins of what we consume but can also foster the desire for healthy, fresh eating. Americans overwhelmingly agree that children having access to gardens, especially community gardens, is valuable. Park and recreation agencies are leaders in bringing gardening opportunities to their community. For many Americans, these garden plots are the only chance they have for growing their own fruits and vegetables.

Key Findings

  • Ninety-two percent of Americans believe children having access to community gardens is valuable
  • More than three in four Americans believe children having access to community gardens is extremely or very valuable
  • African-Americans are more likely to find value in children having access to community gardens compared to white or Hispanic Americans (80 percent, 75 percent, 78 percent respectively)
  • Women tend to find more value in children’s access to community gardens over men (95 percent versus 90 percent respectively)
  • Eighty-two percent of people in the northeast believe children having access to community gardens is extremely or very valuable

 

Park Pulse: Lessons in the Community Garden

Interactive Charts

 

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