Concussions in Youth Sports and Recreation

October 1, 2013, Department, by Roxanne Sutton

Youth are at increased risk for traumatic brain injuries related to sports and recreation activities.173,285: Number of emergency department visits for sports and recreation-related TBIs made annually by children aged 0–19 years.

95,043: Increase in annual emergency department visits for sports and recreation-related TBIs from 2001 to 2009 — a 62 percent increase in a decade.

31: Percentage of sports and recreation-related injuries that occurred in a sports facility.

6.5: Percentage of all youth sports and recreation-related injuries that were TBIs in the past decade.

26,212: Number of annual emergency department visits for sports and recreation-related TBIs caused by bicycling — the highest of all youth sports and recreation activities. Football is a close second with 25,376 annual TBIs.

70: Percentage of all football players in the U.S. that are under the age of 14.

153: Number of annual emergency department visits for sports and recreation-related TBIs caused by bowling — the lowest of all sports and recreation activities.

5,484: Number of annual TBIs caused by playground injuries in children under the age of 4, making playground activities the most common cause of TBIs in that age group.

11,477: Number of annual sports and recreation-related TBIs that require hospitalization or transfer.

71: Percentage of all annual sports and recreation-related TBIs that affect male youth, making them more than twice as likely to suffer from a TBI than female youth.

Sources: Head Impact Exposure in Youth Football: Elementary School Ages 9–12 Years and the Effect of Practice Structure, Nonfatal Traumatic Brain Injuries Related to Sports and Recreation Activities Among Persons Aged ≤19 Years — United States, 2001–2009.